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Where can I buy fresh fish? - here's where!

Here are the best places to source your fish online, some locally, some nationally - there's sure to be a supply of fresh UK fish being sold somewhere near you!
Fresh fish sales across the UK from Fish on Friday
Fresh fish either delivered or available in your area - mainly the South west from Plymouth initiative, Call4Fish.
Fresh fish from all over Cornwall - from the Cornwall Good Seafood Guide - many fish supplied direct from the fishermen!
If you need to know more any of these organisations are only to willing to help - if you want to be included or just want to know where to buy fresh fish near you!

Thursday, 3 September 2020

Export live fish and shellfish.


Check if you need a certificate to export live fish, molluscs, crustaceans and amphibia for aquaculture and ornamental purposes.

Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs, Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, and Animal and Plant Health Agency

Contents 


Apply for an export health certificate You apply for an export animal health certificate by submitting an export notification at least 5 working days before you export.

The form you fill in depends on whether you’re exporting from:

England or Wales (PDF, 166KB, 2 pages) 
Scotland (PDF, 51.7KB, 1 page) 
Northern Ireland (MS Word Document, 31.2KB) 

You’ll get a certificate when your application is approved. If required by the destination country: your goods will be inspected first for EU movements, a TRACES notification will be made for you. Attach the certificate to your consignment. 

Exporting within or outside the EU Within the EU or to Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Iceland Check with the Competent Authority for aquatic animal health in the destination country to find out if you need an export animal health certificate.

If you need a certificate, apply to your Fish Health Inspectorate, who will also advise you whether the certification requirements can be met.

Outside the EU

If your goods are not being used as food, check with the Competent Authority for aquatic animal health in the destination country (or their embassy in the UK to find out what documentation you need. If you need a certificate, apply to your Fish Health Inspectorate, who will also advise you whether the certification requirements can be met.

Endangered fish and shellfish Use the 
Species+ tool to search for your fish or shellfish. Check which annex (A, B, C or D) it’s classified as under EU wildlife trade regulations.

What you need to do depends on whether you’re exporting within the EU or outside the EU.

If Species+ says the fish or shellfish is banned, you cannot export the product.

Within the EU If the fish or shellfish is classed as B, C or D, you do not need to do anything. If it’s classed as Annex A, you must apply for an Article 10 certificate.

You do not need any special documents if you’re using or displaying goods for non-commercial reasons, for example scientific research or in an educational display.

Apply for an Article 10 certificate

Fill in either:

form FED1012 (PDF, 29.6KB, 2 pages) 
form FED1012 (MS Word Document, 24.1KB) 
You can use the guidance notes (PDF, 606KB, 15 pages) to help you.

Email it to wildlife.licensing@apha.gsi.gov.uk or post it to the Centre for International Trade Bristol. Include any supporting documents that show you acquired the product legally, for example:

  • a copy of the import permit

  • a previous Article 10 certificate (use the yellow copy) The certificate costs £31.

You should get your certificate within 15 working days.

Outside the EU If it’s classed as A, B or C, you need a CITES export permit. If it’s classed as D, check the animal’s CITES listing in the Species+ tool. If it’s in Appendix III, you’ll need a CITES export permit. Otherwise you do not need to do anything.

Apply for a CITES permit Fill in either:

form FED0172 (PDF, 96.3KB, 2 pages) 
form FED0172 (MS Word Document, 81.5KB) 
Use the guidance notes (PDF, 739KB, 13 pages) if you need help.

If you’re re-exporting goods include a CITES import permit to prove it legally entered the EU. Email or post the completed form to the Centre for International Trade Bristol.

A permit costs £63 (or £37 to re-export). You should receive it within 15 working days.

If you’re exporting as part of conservation work, you might be able to get a fee waiver through:

form CITB20 (MS Word Document, 198KB) 
form CITB20 (PDF, 58KB, 4 pages) 
You can use the guidance notes (PDF, 290KB, 2 pages) if you’re unsure how to fill it in.

Regular exports for public exhibition If you regularly take fish or shellfish abroad for a short period of time for public exhibitions, you could use a travelling exhibition certificate (PDF, 2.71MB, 208 pages) instead of a CITES permit. You’ll need to follow the usual rules for exporting fish.

You can use the certificate whether you’re moving goods within or outside the EU. You can add multiple specimen types in one application. It’s valid for 3 years.

To apply, fill in form FED0173 (PDF, 64.4KB, 2 pages).

Post or email the completed form to the APHA Centre for International Trade Bristol. You’ll get your certificate within 15 working days and there’s no fee.