Saturday, 22 January 2022

Job vacancy: Deputy Harbourmaster for Newlyn.

 

Friday, 21 January 2022

Newlyn netter Govenek of Ladram detained in Castletownbeare.


Around midnight on Wednesday the EFCA Fishery Protection Vessel Aegis... 



detained the British registered Newlyn based gillnetter in the Celtic Sea for an alleged fishing offence ...



and is escorted her into Castletownbere...


the Vigo based EU fisheries protection vessel makes weekly round trip to Cork to pick up the EU fisheries observers...


the Aegis was on patrol south east of Baltimore when she headed southwest and then west towards the Govenek of Ladram...


who was fishing for hake west side of the Pistola Bank. 

A statement from the Sea Fisheries Protection Authority said:

"The officers on board the European Fisheries Control Agency’s (EFCA) chartered vessel, AEGIS 1, in the Celtic Sea are part of EFCA’s joint deployment plan for Western waters. The AEGIS 1 escorted the fishing vessel into Castletownbere, at the SFPA’s request, where it is being detained for the suspected infringement of fishing gear regulations. EFCA organises joint fisheries control and inspection activities under joint deployment plans with national sea-fishing regulatory authorities, including the SFPA." 


The detention occurred after a 'routine' inspection when the observers were unhappy with the number of dolphin 'pingers' employed by the Govenek.  Skipper Phil Mitchell said later that he was using the latest in dolphin pingers which have a range of 2.5km and are twice as powerful as the original version and EU regulation approved. Pingers were deployed at the end of each tier of nets as per normal when fishing for hake but this did not satisfy the SFPA inspectors and the Govenek was escorted in to port to await a judgment - with skipper Phil facing impounding the vessel, confiscation of his catch and a maximum of ten years in jail - not a comforting thought for any skipper. 



Eventually, the boat was released without charge this afternoon and headed back to the grounds, not that will make up for two days lost fishing!

First freezing #FishyFriday this year in Newlyn!

The sight of an ill-fitting hard hat three sizes too small earlier in the week provided a first glimpse of the big Padstow man himself...


in this celebration of skippers-to-be in the Swordfish circa 1985 cuddling a very young Billy Bunn, alongside another big skipper-to-be, Don Liddicoat and (seated) skipper/owner of the Ocean Harvester, Mervyn Mountjoy, sadly now no longer with us...


interesting headgear of some sort has always been a feature of...


young Roger Coutsoubos' time at the fishing...


Tom Hill at the helm, of the landing winch...


and relief sipper of the good ship Enterprise putting the starboard side trawl back together...


every night is sardine night at the moment...

even tough the boats are on a 10 ton daily quota...


as problems with the export of fish to the EU via France are still fraught with issues over sending fish away in seawater which does not meet the health requirements as the UK is now treated as any other nation state outside of the single market, 'c'est la vie' as they say...


back to a rather chilly sub-zero FishyFriday and there were a few boxes of cuttles on sale...


along with some dinner-plate sized turbot...


big plaice...


perfectly pink red mullet...


braces of Dover sole...


and a good few mackerel...


to go with a fish that to the untrained eye looks just like a Cornsih (megrim) sole...


rays continue to make up a good percentage of trawl trip landings...


as do lemons...


and for the beam trawlers in the fleet, monkfish...


the real thing, Cornish sole...


and one of Cap'n Cod's finest line caught bass...


to go with just a handful of squid who really have not been in evidence for a few years now...


catching the sun's rising rays, the IFCA protection vessel, St Piran...


with not a cloud in the sky and a chill from the Combe river feeding into the bay, the temperature at sea level was -1˚ this morning - which by Cornish standards is close to approaching absolute zero the significance of which may be recalled if you can cast your mind back to that science lesson at school on the subject......


the Trevessa IV is back in her favourite berth...


while the Enterprise waits in the only other berth that is available to her, drawing over 5m at the stern she is severely restricted in her ability to manoeuvre in the harbour other than just just a few hours either side of high water - which is why the harbour's Advisory Board held an exhibition recently to gather the views and thoughts of harbour users in planning for future expansion of the port to cater for the needs of an increasingly larger and more sophisticated fleet of vessels...


'tiz a cold Cornish day...


as the Charlotte Clare hunts for a dawn haul of sardines...


as a handful of hardy souls engage in the latest craze to hit Mounts Bay, taking a selfie on your phone while turning blue in freezing water...


not a bad start to the day for landlubbers either.


 

Thursday, 20 January 2022

Survey on new slipping/shiplift Facilities for Newlyn Harbour.






Newlyn Harbour Advisory Board is undertaking a survey of boat owners and harbour users, to asses the business case for new slipping facilities and advise the harbour commissioners.

The Advisory Board recently held a two day consultation/exhibition in the market over the Christmas period. The consultation/exhibition was held so that Harbour users and the public could view the concept plans for Newlyn's future expansion. Part of the concepts are for a new slipping/shiplift facility, to be located within the harbour. That consultation gave an opportunity for the public to view the plans and give feedback.

We received very positive comments and great feedback for the entire concept plan. For the purpose of this survey, we have included the comments given to the proposed shiplift facility concept.

"We need more slipping berths"  
 
"There needs to be engineering workshops located at Sandy Cove."  
 
"The shiplift needs to cater for all vessels currently in the harbour up 40 metres."  
 
"The shiplift needs to be able to lift heavier and larger boats than the current slip."  
 
"Newlyn needs a multiple berth shiplift like they have in Fraserburgh."  
 
"Any shiplift facility will need a painters shed and workshop."  
 
"Will need scissors-lift machines, pressure washers, and cherry pickers."  
 
"Can we cater for a covered slipping shed for smaller vessels?"  
 
"A crane and hard standing to lift out under 12 metre vessels."  
 
"Shiplift needs to be dredged or deep enough water to take the largest boats on any tide."

From these and other comments and with speaking to harbour users, it is clear that improved and increased slipping/maintenance facilities are very much needed and that these are regarded as a priority.

The questionnaire attached is designed to asses not only the size and weight capacity of any proposed shiplift facility, but to also gauge how much business currently leaves Newlyn to slip elsewhere and also what that costs harbour users in time, plus cost of travelling to other ports.

These questions make up an important part of the business case, so that Newlyn harbour can write a funding bid and make the case to get the best possible outcome for harbour users.

The survey also contains a comments section, for any other feedback. 




You can complete the survey here, online or download the same form from this link and return via post to:

Advisory Board
Harbour Office
22 The Strand
Newlyn
TR18 5HW






The slip in Newlyn is in constant use with vessels of all sizes...



but for quick jobs like scrubbing off weed or clearing a fouled prop boats can go ahead of the fish market...


which was used for much bigger boats until the market was extended inwards and dredged in the late 1980s...


or alongside the North Pier...


but that can only be done on big spring tides and involves a degree of risk as the boat needs to be secured so that it leans into the quayside as the tide recedes...


especially as the harbour bed slopes away from the quay...



alternatively, smaller boats make use of the Canners slip, again only on bigger tides - and any work there, as elsewhere in Newlyn is carried out at all times exposed to the elements.

Fisherman's Trailblazer Apprenticeship - what you need to know.


A new fishing apprenticeship has been given the green light and people looking for a career at sea will have the opportunity to start an 18-month Commercial Fishing Apprenticeship, a process which has been led by the Cornish Fish Producers’ Organisation (CFPO).

This week, the CFPO announced the approval of a new national fishing apprenticeship standard, designed by experienced skippers, crew and CFPO Youth Board members. The Commercial Fishing Apprenticeship will be rolled out by training providers from 2022.

“It’s ambitious, but it has to be,” said Chris Ranford, CEO of the CFPO. “We are training the future of the industry, and want to have that in mindset from the start.”

The 18-month level 2 Fisher apprenticeship represents a step-change for the industry by carving out a clear professional pathway into the industry – one that is aspirational, where apprentices will be paid to learn and obtain a raft of qualifications along the way. The apprenticeship has been designed by a Trailblazer group, in conjunction with the Institute for Apprenticeship and Technical Education and funding support from The Fishmongers’ Company. The Trailblazer group has a diverse membership of young and experienced skippers, vessel owners and crew members from around the English coast, ensuring the standard is rooted in the needs of the industry.

“Contributing our experience meant we could ensure the apprenticeship included those skills I look for as an employer,” said vessel owner and CFPO member Anthony Hosking, who Chairs the Trailblazer group. “This recognised qualification will be a mark of excellence for the next generation.”

The CFPO led regular workshops which provided a platform for the forward-looking younger members of the Trailblazer group to shape the standard by sharing what young people want from a career, alongside their experiences of entering the industry and the barriers they’ve faced, whilst experienced skippers could share knowledge borne from years at sea.

“The apprenticeship had to be appealing to young people, which was a crucial role for the Youth Board,” said Trailblazer group and CFPO Youth Board member Brackan Pearce. “This course will help to reshape how young people see fishing, making it a more attractive and exciting career choice. We now have something that we can market to young people to encourage them into a career in fishing.”

The apprenticeship will build the knowledge and skills needed to understand the range of vessels and catching methods in use, the important role of science, data collection and sustainability, plus the practical skills involved in engineering, navigation, and managing and maintaining gear. Safety will be a top priority throughout the course. Apprentices will also gain industry-recognised qualifications throughout the apprenticeship.

For more information, get in touch with Chris Ranford at the CFPO:

 








Wednesday, 19 January 2022

Bluefin tuna tagged for the first time in UK waters with acoustic ‘residency’ tags

 

Blue fin tuna video courtesy of James Roberts fishing for Cornish  sardines in Mounts Bay 2021.

This work is part of the FISH INTEL project, led by the University and funded by the EU’s Interreg France (Channel) England programme

Bluefin tuna have been tagged with state-of-the-art acoustic tracking tags for the first time in UK waters. The huge fish, which in UK waters can be up to 2.5m long, are commercially valuable and biologically fascinating. The 7cm long tags send individually coded sound (acoustic) messages to listening stations moored on the seabed, allowing the team to record how long bluefin tuna are in UK waters each year.

The project team has attached acoustic tags to 30 bluefin tuna. The tags will also help the project team understand when the fish arrive, and how quickly they can make the journey across the Channel to France.

Dr Lucy Hawkes, Senior lecturer in ecology at the University of Exeter, is leading the bluefin tagging work. She said:

We typically see bluefin tuna in waters around the south-west UK in the summer and autumn months, but do not know if we are seeing the same fish every year, nor the same fish all summer. For the first time we will be able to tell, with the acoustic tracking tags sending data for up to five years.”

The team have already heard 81 messages from the tags across five listening stations in south-west UK, including one fish several times.

This work is part of the FISH INTEL project, funded by the EU’s Interreg France (Channel) England programme, which is establishing a network of acoustic receivers on both sides of the Channel.

The research will assist authorities across the Channel region to implement Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management (EBFM) programmes with the aim of enhancing the condition and water quality of these habitats, as well as enabling human activities – such as fishing, civil engineering projects and extract industries – to function in a sustainable way.

The project lead for FISH INTEL, Dr Emma Sheehan, said:

Bluefin tuna are sentinels of healthy ecosystems, and travel between waters that provide them with food and clean conditions. Developing a clear understanding of their movements will help us not only pinpoint those habitats, but also implement measures to preserve and protect them in the future.” 

The team will continue to collect data from the tagged fish until 2026, and will gain the most comprehensive understanding of the importance of UK waters to bluefin tuna to date.

Tuesday, 18 January 2022

UK Government and Devolved Governments seek views on the Joint Fisheries Statement.


Today, the UK Government, Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs in Northern Ireland, Scottish Government, and Welsh Government are launching a public consultation on the Joint Fisheries Statement (JFS).

A key component of the Fisheries Act 2020, the Joint Fisheries Statement sets out the legally binding policies the UK Government and Devolved Governments will follow, at a UK level and individually, as they work together to deliver world-class sustainable fisheries and aquaculture management.

Consultation to run from 18 January to 12 April 2022, inviting views from industry, NGOs and all affected by policies in the Joint Fisheries Statement.

Today, the UK Government, Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs in Northern Ireland, Scottish Government, and Welsh Government are launching a public consultation on the Joint Fisheries Statement (JFS).

A key component of the Fisheries Act 2020, the Joint Fisheries Statement sets out the legally binding policies the UK Government and Devolved Governments will follow, at a UK level and individually, as they work together to deliver world-class sustainable fisheries and aquaculture management.

The consultation, running from 18 January to 12 April 2022, will welcome views from industry and environmental stakeholders, the public and all those interested and affected by the proposed policies.

The Joint Fisheries Statement sets out policies from the respective governments for achieving, or contributing to achieving, the eight objectives outlined in the Fisheries Act 2020 which will help to achieve the UK’s vision for clean, healthy, safe, productive, and biologically diverse oceans and seas.

In line with the Fisheries Act’s objectives and international obligations, the Joint Fisheries Statement sets out how the UK will adopt an ecosystem-based approach to fisheries management and includes a commitment to mapping and protecting our blue carbon resources.

It recognises the importance of fishing and aquaculture, and the benefits it provides to all parts of the UK as a source of employment and identity for our coastal communities. To support this, the Joint Fisheries Statement includes policies to help the industry thrive, including commitments to upskilling industry and succession planning, and promoting the consumption of locally sourced seafood.

The Joint Fisheries Statement sets out three main areas to deliver our ambition:

  • Protecting and, where necessary, recovering our fish stocks; 
  • Reducing the effects of fishing on the marine and coastal environment; and 
  • Supporting a modern, resilient, and environmentally responsible fishing industry.

Environment Secretary George Eustice, said:

The Fisheries Act has given us the powers to implement our own independent fisheries policy, improve our marine environment and make decisions based on the health of our fish stocks and not vested interests. Today, we are setting out our shared vision for a sustainable fishing industry that delivers for our fishermen, the environment and the whole Union.

We have taken back control of our waters, and a year on from the Trade and Cooperation Agreement a positive picture is emerging for our fishing industry. We have seen an increase in quota that will amount to around £146 million by 2026 and we are investing £100M into coastal communities so that they can benefit from better infrastructure, new jobs and investment in skills.


Edwin Poots MLA, Minister of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs in Northern Ireland, said:

I’m pleased that we are now in a position to share this consultation draft of the Joint Fisheries Statement. The Fisheries Act 2020 was the first, key milestone for the fishing industry in Northern Ireland as the UK entered a new era as an independent coastal State.

This draft JFS is the next key milestone. We promised a JFS, and we are now delivering on it. It forms an important part of the overall fisheries framework, as it will set out our plans to pursue sustainable fisheries policies that will benefit both the fishing industry and the marine environment for many years to come. “I would encourage everyone who has an interest in achieving the UK’s vision of having clean, healthy, safe, productive and biologically diverse oceans and seas to get involved in this consultation as we further develop this draft JFS.


Mairi Gougeon MSP, Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs and Islands:

I am pleased to launch the Joint Fisheries Statement (JFS) which respects the devolution settlement on fisheries management and is clear about the limits and extent of its role in terms of devolved powers and responsibilities. This document is the result of careful work by officials from across the UK and demonstrates what can be achieved though meaningful and purposeful engagement.

The Joint Fisheries Statement will help us use our devolved powers to secure a sustainable future for the Scottish fishing industry, onshore and offshore, within the context of tackling the twin crises of climate and biodiversity and our commitment to achieve and maintain good environmental status for all of Scotland’s seas.


Lesley Griffiths MS, Minister for Rural Affairs and North Wales, and Trefnydd Wales said:

I am pleased to be launching this consultation with the other UK fisheries policy authorities following close collaboration. The JFS reflects the devolved nature of fisheries, whilst recognising the benefits of joined up working. We all want to see fishing and aquaculture industries which are sustainable and environmentally responsible, as well as economically viable and thriving. I want to thank everyone, including the industry, who have engaged with us during the development stage and I now look forward to hearing views on the proposals we have set out.

The UK Government and Devolved Governments are committed to working closely with industry and are seeking views from stakeholders to ensure the Joint Fisheries Statement works with the needs of our industry and marine environment. The consultation document can be found here.