Wednesday 21 February 2024

Newlyn FISH Trust – seeking new Trustees

 


The Newlyn Fishing, Industry and Seafarers Heritage (FISH) Trust, is seeking new trustees to support the growth of our young charity.

The Trust was set up by a group of local residents who came together with the aim of protecting and sharing the culture and heritage of Newlyn, with the following charitable purpose:

“To advance the education of the public in the history, culture and heritage of Newlyn, Cornwall, in particular but not exclusively through the provision of exhibitions, lectures, workshops, traditional crafts demonstrations and other events.”

 

More information on the charity can be found here. We are particularly interested in receiving applications from people with the following skills and experience:
  • HR and/or Volunteer management
  • Finance: accounting and planning
  • Legal
  • Fundraising
  • Community engagement (grassroots)
  • Learning and education
  • Museum/heritage experience
  • Comms (PR, Social Media, Press)

We are aiming to recruit four trustees to join our current Board of six. We’re looking for people with a passion for Newlyn and its heritage, a commitment to supporting heritage being saved for future generations and local stories being shared with wider audiences.

We need people who are able to bring energy and commitment, engage in healthy debate, respect others’ viewpoints and most importantly, to take a proactive part in the charity’s activity.

You don’t need prior board experience – support will be provided. If you think you’ve got the skills, experience and personal qualities to support us in taking our next vital step, we would be delighted to hear from you.

Our Trustee Prospectus and Application Form can be found on our website

Closing date for applications: 5pm on Friday 1st March 2024

Monday 19 February 2024

Four seasons in four days and a mizzly Monday morning's market in Newlyn.


Landing time for the...


demoted blue boat, now just plain Gordon...




as she lays astern of the gorgeous varnished Britannia V...


an adventure playground for some harbour residents...



always good to see the lifeboat on her mooring...




Stelissa, heading for the ice works before she sails...



seems the sun shines only on the righteous...



the historic Old Harbour will be looking for volunteers to help with the planned restoration of its quay and slipways...



a precursor to it becoming a centre for the local lugger fleet, not just the Barnabas seen here on her mooring..



come Monday and netters like the Ajax have found plenty of hake...



as has the Silver Dawn...



with hundreds of boxes filling Zone One...



from the Ygraine...



Celtic Dawn...



and the seiner Accionna...



which also landed a cracking haul of red mullet...



other quality fish like this huge tub gurnard...



monk tails...



plaice



and Dovers from a mix of inshore trawlers and the beam trawler Trevessa V...



the handliners and small inshore boats dipped into a few shoals of herring...



and good sized mackerel...



as did the sardine fleet working over the weekend...



all of which helped fill the market from end-to-end



with seasonal roes and unseasonal John Dory, there's always a few to be had if you know where to go...



as ever, the netters picked up spurdog - for years hundreds of tons were dumped back over the side until a monthly quota was introduced to allow boats to land some of what they catch rather than dump the entire catch back...



hopefully, the 500kg a month by-catch quota that the over 10m boats have will ensure that too much pollack does not end up back on the seabed in the coming months - March will be a critical month as all these big fish gather to spawn.....




unlike beam trawlers and cuttles...



just in to land in the heavy Monday morning mizzle, Mitch with the Govenek of Ladram...



who came to find there was no room in Zone 3 to put his fish...



ahead of Mitch, Ed on the Joy of Ladram also had a good shot of hake to put ashore for tomorrow's auction...



there's a soul sole on the seabed...



a brace of netters landing to the fish market.




 

Sunday 18 February 2024

Last of the Custodians



Embark on a cinematic journey through the rich maritime history of Lyme Bay as ‘The Last Custodians’ unveils the untold stories of inshore fishing and the resilient fishermen who navigate the waters across the four ports of Beer, Axmouth, Lyme Regis and West Bay in East Devon and West Dorset. This documentary premiered amidst the captivating backdrop of the four bustling ports and casts a poignant spotlight on the challenges and triumphs of those who depend on the sea, weaving a narrative of tradition, sustainability, and the indomitable spirit of coastal communities. 

These fishermen, guardians of the seas, stand resilient against the ebb and flow of time. Anchored to their coastal communities, they embody the custodianship of marine treasures, weaving a vital tapestry that sustains livelihoods and traditions. Through their unwavering commitment, these seafaring stewards nurture the ocean’s bounties and the interconnected prosperity of the communities that depend on their steadfast dedication.

Saturday 17 February 2024

Shine on Debbie, star of the Star Inn.






At the heart of Newlyn's fishing community is its pubs. The Fishermen's Arms, the Red Lion, the Star, the Dolphin, the Swordfish and the Tolcarne. Most times couples have run them, Mike and Kath in the Fish, Bill and Pat in the Dolphin, Pete and Marcia in the Swordfish.  Most times but not always.

In the Star for the last 24 years, it was just diminutive Debbie. Taking on any pub is a challenge, taking on a pub when your 5' 5" in the heart of a big and busy fishing port with a clientele of fishermen serious about spending their hard-earned wages on landing day is another prospect altogether. Just to top that, she also brought sons, Jack and Ben into this world.

But taking on is what Debbie was supremely good at and did whenever the occasion arose. Whether it was raising money for the Harbour Lights, seeing the Raft Race happen every year, fighting good causes like animal welfare or just taking on fighting customers - she took on life and everything that came her way with a huge spirit - ask anyone in Le Doris Bar in Kerity, Brittany.

When you run a pub that is not just any old pub but one that has maritime history seeped in its floorboards and then make it your own and, literally, write your own history, that takes some doing. Like any pub, thousands of customers over the years have sat in the window seats downing a few beers dreaming of a better life - in 1854 a handful of fishermen turned one such ale-fuelled conversation into reality - a few months later, they set sail on what was to become the "Voyage of the Mystery" - the first trans-oceanic voyage made in a small sailing boat - Newlyn to Melbourne in Australia. One hundred and fifty-four years later, Debbie entertained Pete Goss and his crew in the Star the night before they set sail in the Spirit of Mystery to re-create that incredible voyage.

But for Debbie, running the Star was much more than just serving pints or refusing to. Not just the everyday birthday celebrations, wakes, music nights and skippers settling up back in the days of landing money in cash but so much more. Over the years it became a hub for those who see that the Raft Race and Harbour Lights transform the village year on year and host to many other meetings and get-togethers. 

However, not content to give everyone in the pub a good time, Debbie felt drawn to bring pub and village goings-on to a wider audience outside and hence, the blackboard. 



What started as a means of advertising special offers...




soon morphed into a running commentary on the life and times of the village - whether it happened inside or out, there wasn't much that escaped her attention, ably supported by a network of co-conspirators at times.

If you were lucky, you got a name check...



sometimes you wish you didn't...


but plenty got their cards marked in some way...






sometimes more than once...











some days were busier than others...



sometimes the comments were reciprocated...


for some of the regulars...


or she added a more personal thought...



sometimes additional comments were required...


or were just plain personal..







or some that might have featured on Sky's, "Britains Most Notorious Pubs"...



and when you run out of birthdays its time for the awful jokes

















sometimes it was political...






or in the name of good causes...










or just offering sage words of advice...














or wise words for visitors, especially around Fish Festival day...




or something more local...





or even someone or something that irked her...












or needed thanks...



or otherwise...






or just things to make you smile on your way to the Coop......





or slightly tongue in cheek...






ale sales, all in a good case...







at last!...




just plain simple community support...



or more a case of, "if you know, you know"...


or sometimes, not often, asking for advice...


well that was Debbie some time ago now, way back in 2010...




one of the more memorable moments was when the smoking ban in pubs became a thing and as usual, Debbie stood up to the mark and provided her nicotine dependant customers with something to stand under whenever they felt the urge and the weather was inclement...




Like the book or not, Debbie's role as landlady of the Star was chronicled in print along with that of her near neighbour, the Swordfish.  The book often reads like hundreds of overheard conversations of the kind that both pubs thrive on and make them what they are - a life force in the harbour. 


St Peter's Church in Newlyn was barely big enough to host all those that came to see her off from where, to the sounds of, "We're off to the the Wizard, the wonderful Wizard of Oz", family and friends made their way back to the Star and did what Debbie would have wanted, laughed, cried, hugged, drank and sung in her memory.


Nearest pub neighbour and long time landlord of the Swordfish, Pete Bell had these words for his arch licensed victualler rival, 

"Debs was one of the last of original landlady, a person that understood her customers. She will also be missed on the Newlyn Lights. She will have them all singing and dancing up there."


RIP Debbie.